Zombie

Show Title: 
Zombie
Directed by: 
Thomas Caruso
Scenery by: 
Josh Zangen
Written by: 
Bill Connigton
Produced by: 
Razors Edge Productions
Lighting Design by: 
Joel E. Silver

   Zombie is Bill Connigton's new adaptaion of the Joyce Carol Oate's novella. The new work follows a Jeffery Dahmer type serial killer, Quentin P,  as he attempts to explain his thought process as he kidnaps, abuses, and kills his victims. While the general first impression of the story is one of shock, the character is written in such a matter of fact way that you end up sympathizing with his desire for companionship. Quentin is very methodical and straight forward about his desire to have a slave, or a zombie. He truly believes that this is what will make him happy. We, as the audience, follow Quentin on this journey and watch as his frustrations grow into homicidal rampages.

  This production of the new work was tricky because it was presented in a very small space with limited options. Because of the unconventional nature of the show, I decided to use unconventional lighting instruments. I found 3 light sources to add to the visual vocabulary. The first was the overhead table lamp which served to set the tone and scene of the show. The second was a mercury vapor exterior light, a very harsh light source, and I adjusted the color to be a very yellow and unnatural color. The third was a similar mercury vapor lamp that I color corrected to be a much starker blue. 

   As Quentin explained his various experiences I set the scene with the conventional lighting and as he went into a darker place I added the Mercury Vapors so that as he got darker and darker in his stories, we followed him by adding an unnatural color. The beauty of the fixtures is that they turn on so slowly that the audience members, similarly to Quentin's victims,  doesn't notice what is happening until it is fully established. In this way I was able to take the audience further into the demented world of Quentin's mind and pop them back into reality as he softens his monologue.